Tag Archives: 2500HD

Chalk Up Another Win For The 2011 Sierra HD – Best In Class Towing and Payload

Not only does the 2011 GMC Sierra HD pickup offer the most power in its class, and a Denali trim level, but you can count another win for The General over its heavy-duty pickup competition – best-in-class towing and payload figures. The new trucks will now be able to tow 21,700 lbs in fifth-wheel configuration and 17,000 lbs with a traditional ball hitch, as well as handle 6,635 lbs of payload. The new trucks best their closest competitor – the Ford F350 – by a whopping 1,000 lbs in conventional towing, and 100 lbs in fifth wheel configuration.

Based on these improved capacities, the Sierra HD becomes the most capable heavy duty pickup on the market. The trucks start production next week, and we expect to start seeing them on the lot sometime in late summer. Come on in and test them against the competition, we know you won’t be disappointed!

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Introducing the 2011 GMC Sierra 2500HD Denali

GM has announced that for the 2011 model year, the Sierra HD will have an available Denali trim level. This marks the first time the exclusive Denali nameplate has been offered on an HD pickup – some of the discernable features include the four-bar chrome grille with the Denali round air inlets from the Sierra and Yukon, along with body colored bumpers, chrome door handles, chrome accents, and either 18- or 20-inch wheels. The truck will be available with your choice of the 6.0L gas V8 or the new 6.6L Duramax diesel V8 mentioned in the previous post.


More power for the 2011 Duramax Diesel

GM has recently announced the power ratings for the 2011 Duramax Diesel V8, and its up – WAY up. The 2011 Duramax will have 397 hp and a whopping 765 lb.-ft. of torque, up 32 hp and 105 lb.-ft. from the previous Duramax. As you can see from the chart below, that gives the Silverado/Sierra HD an advantage in both horsepower and torque over its diesel bretheren from Ford and Dodge. (Thanks to pickuptrucks.com for the chart.) Some of the features of the new Duramax, from the official GM press release:

* Main bearing profiles changed to enhance oil film thickness
* Oil pump flow increased for more pressure at low speeds
* A revised turbocharger oil circuit for increased pressure at the turbo and faster oil delivery
* Connecting rod pin ends modified to provide increased piston support
* New, higher-strength piston design
* A new 30,000-psi (2,000 bar) piezo-actuated fuel injection system – capable of operating on ASTM grade B20 biodiesel – ensures more precise fuel delivery, improving emission performance
* An EGR cooler bypass reduces high-mileage soot deposits in the cooler and EGR circuit (pickup versions only).

The more powerful 6.6L Duramax is also more fuel-efficient – up to 11-percent greater highway fuel economy than the outgoing model – reduces NOx emissions by up to 63 percent and helps enable greater towing ratings. Silverado 3500HD equipped with a fifth wheel hitch can tow up to 20,000 pounds (9,072 kg). The increased fuel efficiency, combined with a new, 36-gallon (136 L) fuel tank, provides up to 680 miles (1,090 km) of highway driving between fill-ups.

With nearly 1.3 million Duramax diesel engines put into operation since its launch in 2000, no other automaker has as much diesel engine development experience for meeting the demands of the heavy-duty truck customer


A Quick Update on the 2011 Duramax

GM issued a press release not too long ago regarding the new emission control technology for their 2011 Duramax Diesel. We had a post about the new Duramax last month, so this information should clear up some of the questions we all had about the size of tank and heating system on the Urea injection.

GM’s 6.6L Duramax diesel features the latest in emission control technology, making it the cleanest Duramax engine ever produced, with NOx emissions reduced by at least 63 percent, compared to the 2010 model. NOx emissions are controlled via a Selective Catalyst Reduction aftertreatment system that uses urea-based Diesel (Emission) Exhaust Fluid (DEF). The DEF is housed in a 5.3-gallon (20 L) tank and needs to be replenished about every 5,000 miles (8,000 km). Electrically heated lines feed the DEF to the emission system to ensure adequate delivery in cold weather.

The 2011 Duramax 6.6L will also include GM’s second-generation diesel particulate filter system. Unlike most of the competition, the Duramax regenerates its diesel particulate filter using a downstream injection of diesel fuel directly into the exhaust stream and can travel up to 700 miles (1,125 km) between regenerations – a 300-mile (482 km) increase over the previous Duramax engine. The use of downstream injection also helps to improve engine life by eliminating concerns surrounding the possibility of diesel fuel contaminating engine oil, which can happen when fuel used for regeneration is introduced directly into the cylinder.

We should be receiving the new Duramax trucks in the 3rd quarter of this year – check back for any new information.